PRELUDE
Four-voice fugue with two chorales - lengthened and shortened

Ach Gott, erhör mein Seußzen – Hatikvah


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ACH GOTT, ERHÖR MEIN SEUFZEN UND WEHKLAGEN
Jacobus Peter Schechs, 1648
Praxis Pietatis, Frankfurt 1662
J.S.Bach, B.A. 39. N°2 - BWV 254
Johann Ludwig Krebs, Krebs-WV 513


Jakobus Peter Schechs (1607-1659), a German Lutheran preacher and poet, became, like Bach, orphan at young age and died sick in 1659.
His most well-known and revered religious poem is "Ach Gott, erhör mein Seufzen und Wehklagen", a sorrowful meditation on the suffering on the Cross, but also on consolation and hope of liberation of all good hearts from the burden of this world’s Evil and sin.
The chorale melody was added in 1662 and reused by great masters like Bach and his pupil Krebs in various chorale preludes and adaptations for organ or choir.

O God, hear my sigh
and my complaint,

Do not leave me
to despair in my need

You know my sorrow,
you know my heart

If you laid it on me
help me to carry it!


HATIKVAH
Giuseppe Cenci, La Mantovana, ca. 1600
Pod Krakowem (Polish)
Cucuruz cu frunza-n sus (Romanian)
Ik zag Cecilia komen (Flemish)
Kateryna Kucheryava (Ukrainian)
Bedrich Smetana, Má vlast - Die Moldau
Hatikvah, Samuel Cohen, 1888


The melody for Hatikvah derives from La Mantovana, an Italian song composed by Giuseppe Cenci (Giuseppino del Biado) ca. 1600 with the text “Fuggi, fuggi, fuggi da questo cielo”.
It was later known in early 17th-century Italy and Renaissance Europe as Ballo di Mantova. The adaptation of the music for Hatikvah was set by Samuel Cohen in 1888, on a text by Naphtali Herz Imber, a Jewish poet from Poland.
When the State of Israel was established in 1948, Hatikvah was proclaimed the national anthem.

As long as in the heart, within,
A Jewish soul still yearns,

And onward, towards the ends of the east,
an eye still gazes toward Zion;

Our hope is not yet lost,
The hope two thousand years old,

To be a free nation in our land,
The land of Zion and Jerusalem.



Sources and translation: Wikipedia
© 2018 Copyright Dimitri Arnauts. All rights reserved.